Author Archives: edwinmontoyazorrilla

You may be, from time to time, required to work reasonable additional hours

What does it take to bring about change within a conservative profession? This question may appear moot at a time of industry-wide changes brought about by technology, diversity and cross-industry competition as if change were inevitable. Yet, for lawyers bound to the office for such long hours that having a life outside of work becomes […]

Art against gentrification

This article was originally published in Arena magazine. Artists have long been associated with the poor, derelict quarters of cities. But it is only in the last few decades that art scenes in general have sought out such areas as their habitus. Marginality has become an important component of artistic capital, and working-class and industrial […]

The Global Legal Hackathon

I have recently become involved with ace organisation The Legal Forecast. On the weekend of the 24th of February, I helped TLF organise the Sydney Round of the Global Legal Hackathon. I also wrote about the event from the perspective of a lawyer and ethnographer, in three separate pieces which were published in Thomson Reuters […]

We Need to Slow Down Nature Tourism

This article was originally published in We Are Explorers. Today, few secret pristine spots remain secret, or pristine, for very long. Take only pictures and leave only footprints. These are perhaps the two most broad and important nature conservation commandments for explorers to follow. There are few things more satisfying than keeping a slice of nature […]

Travel Guide to the Ruins

This essay was co-written with Angus Reoch, and originally published in The Hong Kong Review of Books. To be a tourist is to be out of time, and out of place. The moment of arrival is one where our path is erased behind us, and with it our anchor to the present. Every new present, every […]

Demolish the fairground spectacles

‘Look on my works, ye Mighty, and despair!’ tells the inscription on the all-but-extinguished remains of the statue in Percy Shelley’s now-mythical poem, ‘Ozymandias’. Time itself has waged war on the statue and its very meaning: the source of despair is no longer its grandeur, but the forcefulness of its wearing away at the hands […]

Zombies in Hamburg, or The Mythologies of Crisis

Protests are marked by the waves of sound they produce- the ebb and flow of chants and the percussive energy of the crowd’s movement. Amid all the noise, it is quite often not the upsurge in volume, but the rare silences, that inflect the tone of the protest. These moments appear to present an enigma. […]

Art On Satellite Dishes For An Immigrant Community In Berlin

This article was originally published in Edge of Humanity Magazine.   Berlin’s beating heart may be somewhere between Kreuzberg and Friedrichshain, but its ears are in Schoeneberg. Crammed into an unlikely juncture on the side of Potsdamer Strasse lies the Pallasseum, a community housing complex almost entirely populated by migrants. Its most eye-catching feature – the […]

An occupation in the heart of Berlin

  Red banners on the windows, hammocks in the hallway, and each day a flurry of workshops, strategy meetings and movie screenings announced on a noticeboard in the foyer. The Institute of Social Sciences at Humboldt University appears busier than ever and yet no lectures are taking place here. As of now, the political situation […]

Walter Benjamin’s Arcades

And nothing at all of what we are saying here actually existed. None of it has ever lived-as surely as a skeleton has never lived, but only a man. As surely, however, <broken off> <Do,3 > The impression of the old-fashioned can arise only where, in a certain way, reference is made to the most […]